Choose a Subject:

Modern Foreign Languages

Students learn French and Spanish. As well as developing linguistic skills and knowledge, we as a department strive to foster and encourage a lasting enjoyment and appreciation of Modern Foreign Languages and their associated culture and traditions. We believe in developing oral and written fluency, supported by careful study and practice of grammar and vocabulary. We aim to develop the skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing through a wide range of activities including: class oral work, pair work, group work, acting out dialogues, vocabulary learning, oral and written grammar drills, listening to and watching recorded material, songs, playing language games, dictation, using interactive computer resources, reading comprehension, translation work and writing compositions.

Co-curricular activities

We offer French, Spanish and Latin language clubs. The Year 7s students spend 5 days in France participating in a range of cultural activies and Years 10 and 12 have the opportunity to take part in a trip to Madrid.

Head of Department: Mr C Hortense

Teachers: Miss N Allen (maternity leave), Miss R LeSeelleur (maternity leave), Mrs J Mason, Mr P Wheeler, Mrs H Clegg, Miss A Panebianco, Mrs C Mercher (maternity cover) and Mrs S Atkins (maternity cover)

MFL Assistants: Mrs L Bainbridge and Mrs C Moreau

Years 7, 8 and 9

Year 7 French

Main grammatical concepts: articles; gender; nouns; regular and some irregular verbs in the present tense; negation; adjectives; prepositions.
Main topical contexts: greetings; classroom commands and vocabulary; numbers; expressing opinions; time; daily routine; clothes; weather and seasons; self and family; animals; school life; family life; food and drink.

Year 8 French

Main grammatical concepts: revision of grammar normally covered in Year 7; additional irregular verbs, reflexive verbs and modal verbs in the present tense; more extensive use of adjectives; object pronouns; introduction to the perfect tense.
Main topical contexts: shopping; travel and transport; geographical surroundings; jobs; school life; family life; food and drink.

Year 8 Spanish

Main grammatical concepts: articles; gender; nouns; regular and some irregular verbs in the present tense; negation; adjectives; prepositions.
Main topical contexts: greetings; classroom language; numbers; expressing likes and dislikes; time; daily routine; geographical surroundings; countries and nationality; self and family and pets; school life; family life; food and drink

Year 9 French

Main grammatical concepts: revision of present tense and consolidation of grammar covered in Year 8; adjectives; personal pronouns; negatives; perfect, imperfect and future tenses.
Main topical contexts: personal identification; house and home; geographical surroundings; tourism; school; free time; holidays.

Year 9 Spanish

Main grammatical concepts: revision of present tense and consolidation of grammar covered in Year 8; adjectives; personal pronouns; preterite, imperfect and future tenses.
Main topical contexts: personal identification, house and home, geographical surroundings, school, free time, holidays.

National Curriculum

Year 10 - 11

A GCSE course in Modern Languages allows you to develop your ability to understand the spoken and written language and express yourself both orally and in writing. Your skills will be developed through a variety of activities, including giving presentations, group work, independent research, pair work, the use of ICT and the chance to work in small groups with the foreign Language Assistants. 

GCSE MFL Course Outline

At the end of Year 9, students must continue their study of at least one modern foreign language but may also opt to study two. Having qualifications in two foreign languages can be a real asset in today’s globalised work market and will look impressive on a curriculum vita when applying for university and jobs.

It is school policy to enter all pupils for the GCSE language examination. The Department follows the Edexcel syllabus for French and Spanish.

It is school practice to enable bi-lingual students to take the GCSE in their mother tongue. It is not always possible to cater for the speaking tests on the school site and in some cases a different Examination Board is used.

What is the purpose of studying a foreign language?

A foreign language at GCSE shows a real breadth of knowledge and develops skills of communication and critical thinking, which are readily transferable and highly sought-after in further education and employment. You will develop a wide set of skills, including, but not limited to: presenting written and spoken ideas, communicating, developing, justifying points of view.

What further courses and careers can this lead to?

After completing a GCSE in Languages, you can continue to study it at A level, where you learn more about countries that speak the language - about culture, history, art and literature. As well as traditional language-based careers such as interpreting, translating and teaching, languages open up careers in international companies or anywhere in the world… Airbus Group, Médecins sans Frontières, Renault, Electricité de France (EDF), Zara, SEAT, Banco Santander, L’Oréal…

What topics will I study?

Questions across all four language skills are set in common contexts, addressing a range of relevant contemporary and cultural themes. They are organised into five themes, each broken down into topics and sub-topics.

The five themes are:

  • Identity and culture
  • Local area, holiday and travel
  • School
  • Future aspirations, study and work
  • International and global dimension.

How will I be assessed?

There are exams in all four skill areas of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing at the end of the course in Year 11. There is no coursework or controlled assessment element, though you will naturally be thoroughly prepared for the real thing!

Assessment Structure:

Paper 1: Listening Exam – Understanding and responding to different types of spoken language (25%). Questions are answered in both English and the Target Language.

Paper 2: Speaking Exam – Communicating and interacting effectively in speech for a variety of purposes (25%)

Paper 3: Reading Exam – Understanding and responded to different types of written language (25%). Questions are answered in both English and the Target Language.

Paper 4: Writing Exam – Communicating effectively in writing for a variety of purposes (25%)

Exam Board: Edexcel

http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/modern-languages-2016.html

 

French A Level: Years 12 and 13

Qualifications needed: It is desirable that you have achieved at least the equivalent of GCSE grade 6 before taking this course.
 

The WJEC Eduqas A level in French provides an engaging and exciting opportunity
for students to build on their previous study of French. Through social, intellectual,
historical and political cultural themes students will be able to develop their linguistic
knowledge and cultural understanding of the countries/communities where the
language is spoken. An opportunity to study literature and film will allow students to
undertake a deeper analysis of language structures and increase their cultural
awareness as part of an integrated approach to language learning. A strong focus is
placed on building students' confidence and fluency in spoken French using relevant
and topical themes. The requirement to research an area of personal interest related
to the country/communities where French is spoken will enhance students' cultural
appreciation and enable them to gain a greater awareness of intercultural
differences.

Areas of interest

 

Social issues and trends

 

Political, intellectual and artistic culture

 

Themes

 

 

Being a young person in French-speaking society

  • Families and citizenship
  • Youth trends and personal identity
  • Education and employment opportunities

Understanding the

French-speaking world

  • Regional culture and heritage in France, French-speaking countries and communities
  • Media, art, film and music in the French-speaking world

 

Themes

 

Diversity and difference

  • Migration and integration
  • Cultural identity andmarginalisation
  • Cultural enrichment and celebrating difference
  • Discrimination and diversity

France 1940-1950: The Occupation and post-war years

  • June 1940–May 1945: Life in occupied France; the French Resistance
  • The cultural dimension in occupied France
  • 1945-1950: Rebuilding and restructuring

Examination Outline

 

A-Level

 

Component 1: Speaking

 

30%

 

Component 2: Listening, Reading and Translation

 

50%

 

Component 3: Critical and analytical response in writing:

 

20%

 

 

 

Specification: http://eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/french/as-a-level/eduqas-a-level-french-spec-from-2016.pdf?language_id=1

 

Spanish A Level: Years 12 and 13

Qualifications needed: It is desirable that you have achieved at least the equivalent of GCSE grade 6 before taking this course.

The WJEC Eduqas A level in Spanish provides an engaging and exciting opportunity for students to build on their previous study of Spanish. Through social, intellectual, historical and political cultural themes students will be able to develop their linguistic knowledge and cultural understanding of the countries/communities where the language is spoken. An opportunity to study literature and film will allow students to undertake a deeper analysis of language structures and increase their cultural awareness as part of an integrated approach to language learning. A strong focus is placed on building students' confidence and fluency in spoken Spanish using relevant and topical themes. The requirement to research an area of personal interest related to the country/communities where Spanish is spoken will enhance students' cultural appreciation and enable them to gain a greater awareness of intercultural differences.

Areas of interest

 

Social issues and trends

 

Political, intellectual and artistic culture

 

Themes

 

 

Being a young person in Spanish-speaking society

Families and citizenship

Youth trends and personal identity

Education and employment opportunities

Understanding the Spanish-speaking world

Regional culture and heritage in Spain, Spanish-speaking countries and communities

Media, art, film and music in the Spanish-speaking world

Themes

 

Diversity and difference

Migration and integration

Cultural identity and

marginalisation

Cultural enrichment and celebrating difference

Discrimination and diversity

The two Spains: 1936 onwards

El franquismo: Origins, development and consequences

Post-Civil War Spain

Spain – coming to terms with the past? “Recuperación de la memoria histórica”; attempts to deal with the past; ‘los desaparecidos’; removing the symbols of Franco’s Spain

 

 

Examination Outline

 

A-Level

 

Component 1: Speaking

 

30%

 

Component 2: Listening, Reading and Translation

 

50%

 

Component 3: Critical and analytical response in writing:

 

20%

 

 

 

Specification: http://eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/spanish/as-a-level/eduqas-a-level-spanish-spec-from-2016.pdf?language_id=1

 

Careers Education

The MFL Department has a successful track record of students who have proceeded to study Modern Languages at university.

The Department offers advice to students applying to study Modern Languages in Higher Education.

We offer advice to students considering doing a university degree in Modern Languages or following associated career paths.

We inform Sixth Formers about the Language Show which takes place annually in London in October which they can attend. The Careers Zone at Language Show Live is the place for skilled linguists to meet recruiters, get advice, hear from experts and find a job. There is a Careers Forum where they can find dedicated sessions on how to make best use of their language skills and the opportunities available within the language world. There is a CV Clinic which offers practical CV guidance and free careers advice for jobseekers and language professionals. They can also meet potential employers face-to-face.

Some teachers in the department have also had successful careers in other areas of the world of work and they are able to demonstrate that the academic rigour of an MFL degree course equips students well for the competitive job market, making them attractive to employers and opening up a variety of professional opportunities.

We inform Sixth Form students about work experience opportunities in France and Spain.